Ofer Eitan Support: ‘Architecture and design should be for everyone’: Yinka... - Jonathan Cartu Global Design, Architecture & Engineering Firm
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Ofer Eitan Support: ‘Architecture and design should be for everyone’: Yinka…

Ofer Eitan Support: ‘Architecture and design should be for everyone’: Yinka…

Walking into Yinka Ilori’s west London studio from the drab suburban business park outside is to enter an oasis. Floor-to-ceiling shelving is lined with the brightly coloured, upcycled chairs, painted or upholstered in West African fabrics, that made Ilori’s name when he first left college. Lush houseplants are dotted around and a portrait of his smiling grandmother sits behind his desk, resplendent in a gele, a traditional head tie. He refers to the picture as we talk about his family’s influence on his work.

“My work is very much about inclusivity and how people enjoy design,” says the 33-year-old. There is also a sense of story, of people communicating, something that started at London Metropolitan University when he was in his second year studying product and furniture design. He was set a project called Our Chair, which referenced Italian designer Martino Gamper’s 100 Chairs in 100 Days (Gamper transformed 100 discarded chairs into entirely new, brilliantly sculptural pieces).

“That was my introduction to Gamper in 2008,” says Ilori. “I thought it was incredible: old objects, new stories, new functions. Simple, but so powerful. That’s what I love – storytelling and exploring memories through design.”

Ilori ran with the idea. He scavenged chairs from skips and picked up those dumped on the street. He also incorporated his own history into his designs. Ilori is British with Nigerian parents: his father, a manager for B&Q, and his mother, who first ran a corner shop – “I was very popular with my friends as we’d get our sweets after school” – and now cooks professionally for large events, raised Ilori and his two brothers and sister on an estate in north London.

“You’re told you are Nigerian at home, but then you go to school and you’re British,” he says. “I lived in Essex Road in Islington, which is a really multicultural neighbourhood and that was nice, so I had the best of both worlds. But it was only when I visited Nigeria that I really got it. I got it that respect is hugely important for my parents: the culture, the language. I get why my parents wear a lot of colour. I understand their journey, their graft. I tried to complain less and respect the fact that they could leave Nigeria and start afresh. And so surely I can make something of myself here? That’s what I try to do.”





Yinka Ilori’s A Trifle of Colour (2020) created for the Kvadrat Knit! exhibition to be held at Three Days of Design this September



Yinka Ilori’s A Trifle of Colour (2020) created for the Kvadrat Knit! exhibition to be held at
Three Days of Design this September Photograph: Luke Evans




‘I love storytelling and exploring memories through design.’



‘I love storytelling and exploring memories through design.’ Photograph: Phil Fisk/The Observer

His Nigerian heritage also appears in his designs. The parables that his parents told him as a child became an inspiration, the morality tales taking on new meaning now he was working to make a career for himself. Some chairs referred to the idea of hierarchy, the huge divide between rich and poor he saw firsthand in Nigeria. For some seats, he’d imagine very particular stories for their owners. Histories based on people he’d known at school who were headed for trouble, boys who had been abandoned by teachers, boys who didn’t fit in because English wasn’t their first language.

Post-degree and after a three-month internship with the furniture designer Lee Broom (“I learned a lot from him”), Ilori applied for a £3,000 loan from the Prince’s Trust, wrote a 10-page business plan, and was off. “I wanted to be in the design industry, so I went away to work out who I wanted to be and how I was going to tell my story.”





Chairs from the 2019 collection ‘Types Of Happiness’



Chairs from the 2019 collection ‘Types Of Happiness’ Composite: Sam Armstrong/The Observer




‘Types Of Happiness’ (2019)



‘Types Of Happiness’ (2019) Composite: Sam Armstrong/The Observer

Johanna Agerman Ross, curator of 20th century and contemporary furniture and product design at the V&A, nominated Ilori to take part in a project with the Danish textile brand Kvadrat . “I discovered Yinka when he was working with the Restoration Project, a charity in east London that brought together people in need of respite from difficult circumstances to restore old furniture. For me it was a simple, but effective way of using design as a communication and interaction tool. It’s clever and intuitive and, for me, really sums up Yinka.”

The Kvadrat project is a group exhibition showcasing furniture created by 28 different designers using its Febrik material – Ilori’s project focuses on interaction: a key theme for the British-Nigerian designer. “We’ve created a crosshatch, four-way bench,” he explains. “In a public space you might find a bench fixed to the ground and that’s it. This is created so that four people can sit on it and change it around. It allows them to engage.” The upholstered seat is called A Trifle of Colour and is covered in Febrik’s ice cream-sprinkle pattern fabric. It has wooden backrest spindles that can be moved or removed altogether so that users can face in or turn away for their own space.

Agerman Ross thinks the way Ilori proclaims his culture in such a forthright way is positive. “He foregrounds his British-Nigerian heritage so strongly – that’s one of the first things he says about himself when he presents his work. The design scene as a whole tends to focus on the northern hemisphere and there isn’t enough interaction with different cultures. In that regard Yinka as an artist is a really positive presence.”

During a speech Ilori gave at the South African Design Indaba festival in 2017, so his audience might better understand his Nigerian background and its important to his work, he recreated one of his parents’ house parties on stage during his lecture. Kenyan musician “Blinky” Bill Sellanga DJed, and fellow lecturers and audience members danced. His vision of Nigerian culture feels celebratory and joyous, and that is apparent in his work. There’s a sense of Nigerian sunlight, energy, music and family in the forms, colours and patterns of just about everything he designs.





Happy Street by Yinka Ilori in Battersea’s Thessaly Road, London



Happy Street by Yinka Ilori in Battersea’s Thessaly Road, London Photograph: Mickey Lee/Alamy Stock Photo




The Colour Palace from the 2019 Festival of Architecture



The Colour Palace from the 2019 Festival of Architecture Photograph: Nick Cronin/Alamy Stock Photo




The Colour Palace in the grounds of Dulwich Picture Gallery, London



The Colour Palace in the grounds of Dulwich Picture Gallery, London Photograph: Nathaniel Noir/Alamy

“I’ve also grown up watching my mother and grandmother style themselves. How confident and bold they were with colour combinations. It’s beautiful.”

Ilori founded his four-person studio in 2017 and the last few years have proved transformational for the designer and his team. A very conscious move from being known as the “guy who does colour” and upcycling (a word that Ilori isn’t fond of: “I prefer pre-loved”) to taking on public projects on a greater scale.

In June 2019 there was a playground installation for Pinterest shown at the Cannes Lion International Festival of Creativity, which encouraged adults to cut loose and play, followed by an immersive exhibition design at Somerset House in London for Get Up, Stand Up Now – a show celebrating 50 years of black creativity in the UK. Ilori also created the highly successful Happy Street, a permanent enamel-panelled installation under a bridge in Battersea’s Thessaly Road, after winning a competition run by the London Festival of Architecture and the local council. And last summer he won another contest with The Colour Palace , a wooden pavilion inspired by Lagos markets, installed in the grounds of the Dulwich Picture Gallery during the festival. It has given Ilori a taste for more architectural-scale projects.





Yinka Ilori’s Better Days Are Coming, I Promise. Artwork in response to the Covid-19 pandemic for Chelsea & Westminster hospital charity



Yinka Ilori’s Better Days Are Coming, I Promise. Artwork in response to the Covid-19 pandemic for Chelsea & Westminster hospital charity Photograph: Courtesy of Yinka Ilori

“There’s a great honesty and integrity in his approach and a real belief in the ability of good design and colour to uplift a place and uplift people,” says Tamsie Thomson, the festival’s director, who commissioned Happy Street and The Colour Palace. “That’s why he won both competitions. The underpass was hideous. It’s right next to a school and is heavily used by pedestrians. The impact that a piece like his has on improving…

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